Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts

Written by John Packard


We are receiving many emails from readers and others associated with the flat rolled steel industry regarding the current state of the market, responses to the past two articles written by David Phelps (former president of the AIIS and one of our contributing writers) and on a number of other topics. We appreciate and encourage a healthy exchange of ideas. You can reach us at: info@SteelMarketUpdate.com and you are also welcome to contact me in my office: 800-432-3475.

Steel Market Update has two spots remaining for our next Steel 101: Introduction to Steelmaking & Market Fundamentals workshop which will be held on May 6-7, 2014 in Dearborn, Michigan. The workshop includes a tour of the Severstal Dearborn steel mill. Information and registration details can be found on our website.

I expect to publish another Premium Level supplemental issue of the newsletter on Monday. The article about imports in tonight’s issue would normally be reserved for our Premium Level members. If you would like to learn more about Premium membership you can do so on our website or feel free to contact me in my office: 800-432-3475. Those of you who are on a free trial are already receiving Premium access and you can speak with John Temples or Ryan Packard as they follow-up on your trial about Premium Level membership and other options available.

We expect to have our next imports by product, port and country on the website later this week for our Premium Level members.

As always, all of your business is truly appreciated by all of us here at Steel Market Update.

John Packard, Publisher

 

Latest in Final Thoughts

Final thoughts

Last week was a newsy one for the US sheet market. Nucor’s announcement that it would publish a weekly HR spot price was the talk of the town – whether that was in chatter among colleagues, at the Boy Scouts of America Metals Industry dinner, or in SMU’s latest market survey. Some think that it could Nucor's spot HR price could bring stability to notoriously volatile US sheet prices, according to SMU's latest steel market survey. Others think it’s too early to gauge its impact. And still others said they were leery of any attempt by producers to control prices.